Armstrong Clark Oil Based Wood Deck Stains

Best Armstrong Stain for Fences

by Armstrong

Wood fences have long been used for purposes such as curb appeal, property line marking and privacy. Fences can be made of many types of wood from pressure treated pine and cedar to western redwood. Regardless of wood type, a wood fence should be periodically stained to protect it from the elements. Regular maintenance is necessary to prolong a fence’s life.

Armstrong Clark stain is ideal for most types of wood fences. If dealing with pressure treated pine, pine, cedar, redwood or rough sawn wood then Armstrong is the best stain for fences. Armstrong deck and siding wood stain is designed with an amazing formula consisting of nondrying rejuvenating oils that isolate from the drying oils that stay on top of the wood surface. The drying side of the formula locks in the conditioning oils, which aids in wood rejuvenation. Armstrong stain for fences helps with color retention, water repellency and wood conditioning.

Armstrong Stain for Wood Fences

Fences do not take as much abuse as say a deck floor. A deck floor and the tops of deck hand rails are horizontal surfaces. These surfaces are more prone to water damage, sun exposure and foot traffic. A deck will need to be cleaned and recoated ever 1-3 years. A wood fence is a vertical surface that sheds water off quicker, is not as susceptible to sun exposure and does not have foot traffic. Therefore, a wood fence may only need maintained every 3-5 years on average.

A fence should be cleaned with a wood cleaner, then neutralized with a wood brightener prior to being stained. This will give you the best results. Armstrong stain is available in over a dozen different tones. Not only will it protect the fence from Mother Nature, but it will also enhance the wood grain’s natural beauty. Whether for privacy, curb appeal or both a wood fence that is well taken care of will always look good and last for many years.

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Marcia Sommers
Marcia Sommers
2 years ago

Putting up some redwood fence panels and want a clear finish that will keep the wood from going grey

Rick Smith
Rick Smith
4 years ago

I have 236 ft x 6 ft of pressure treated wood fencing. I have used your product in the past on a deck and was completely satisfied. What would you recommend for a fence. Client prefers to keep natural wood look.
Also could you give me number of gallons of each product you recommend and price.

Rick Smith
Panama City Florida

Danielle Schoenwolf
Danielle Schoenwolf
5 years ago

We have 2736 sqft of pressure treated fence to stain. How much AC stain would we need? It’s a new fence that’s five months old and has never had any product on it before. Does it need cleaned and brightened beforehand? Does this stain need sealed after it’s applied?

Rob
Rob
5 years ago

I installed a 120 linear foot cedar fence in June of 2017. I now want to stain. How many coats do I require? How much cleaner, brightened, and stain? Any other considerations?

Jesse
Jesse
5 years ago

I just had a western red cedar fence installed in June, do I need to clean and brighten the fence using your product ? Or could I stain them after just a light hosing. I live in Chicago. I’m going to order some samples 5o see the difference between natural tone or cedar tone. Also what size air sprayer nozzle would you recommend.?

Jesse
Jesse
5 years ago
Reply to 

Also can the cleaner be used around a lawn? I have grass with in one foot of the fence.

Ron Smith
Ron Smith
6 years ago

Putting up new fence rails (pressure treated) and new cedar pickets for most of the fence but also salvaging non-split existing cedar pickets and running through the planer (after removing metal and testing w/ metal detector). Pickets will be smooth – do I need to do other prep before staining? Would semi-transparent be the best choice for a fence?

Ron Smith
Ron Smith
6 years ago
Reply to 

I think you posted the wrong link – I’m not doing anything with concrete or pavers, just wondering about best stain for a fence that has pressure treated rails and freshly planed cedar pickets (both old and new but extremely smooth surface)

Ron Smith
Ron Smith
6 years ago
Reply to 

Thanks a bunch. I do have a moisture meter already – I checked the boards with it and they’ve already dropped significantly in the last 2 weeks – is there a certain % I can look for if I don’t want to wait a few months for this?

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6 years ago

New front fence installed Nov 2017, 80′ x 8′ tall. South facing. E TX (Tyler). Need stain, both sides need it? Wood smooth 1 side, rough 1 side. Not sure type, assume pressure treated pine. Looks great, heavy rains winter. But TX heat will be brutal. What product & how much? How to apply? thanks

Susan
Susan
6 years ago

Our fence, put in June 2017, is made of rough-sawn, Western Red Cedar. PIckets are horizontal. Posts are treated pine. We live in Houston, TX. What should we use to clean the wood? Could this cleaning be done utilizing a pressure washer? For testing moisture prior to stain application, the semi-transparent stain portion of your site says to use a moisture meter to make sure the cedar is no more than 15% moist. is this meter an expensive instrument?

Nick
Nick
6 years ago

Building a vertical plank rough cedar fence. Considering applying stain prior to construction. Also reading articles that wood must be installed and aged 4+ months prior to applying stain. Is this true for rough cedar?

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