Choosing Armstrong Clark Oil Based Wood Stains will ensure lasting beauty and protection for all your exterior wood surfaces. Backed by five generations of experience in oil-based coatings and cutting edge technology, Armstrong Clark Wood Stains will not only meet your wood protection needs but far exceed them.

Determine the square footage area of the surface you plan to stain. On decks be sure not only to measure the floor but also railings, spindles, steps and all areas that you are planning to stain. Armstrong-Clark Deck and Siding Stains will cover approximately 150-200 sq. ft. per gallon depending on age and wood porosity.

The Armstrong Clark Staining Instructions

Armstrong Clark Deck and Siding Stains come in many different colors and tones. Keep in mind that the actual color results can vary depending on the type, age, condition, and porosity of the wood. Color samples are available if needed.

Prior to using any of the Armstrong Clark Wood Stains it is important to prepare the wood surface properly so the stain will perform as expected. See the RAD Wood Cleaner or Stain Stripper products for properly cleaning the wood surface prior to staining.

Allow the wood surface to dry 1-2 days after it has been cleaned and prepped. Be sure no rain is expected on the day of staining and for 3-4 hours after application so the stain can cure properly.

To apply Armstrong Clark Deck Stain you can use a roller, brush, stain pad, or airless sprayer. Mix the stain thoroughly prior to use. Unlike other stains, Armstrong Deck Stain can be applied in direct sunlight and on hot days. If the first application of stain penetrates within 30 minutes another coat can be applied for added protection.

If applying by sprayer, use a roller or brush to go over the sprayed areas for a more even appearance. After 24 hours use a dry rag to remove any remaining puddles or glossy areas.

Armstrong Clark Wood Stain is environmentally friendly and does not contain an offensive odor. It is easy to apply and very user-friendly. Enhancing the appearance of your deck and giving it lasting protection is the best investment you can make and Armstrong Clark Oil Based Wood Stains makes it easy.

Questions on Staining? Ask Below!

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  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Tom · 07/04/2020
    Typo in my previous post. Should have read I DO plan to follow prep steps....
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Tom · 07/04/2020
    I meant I DO plan to follow the prep steps religiously
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    Tom · 07/04/2020
    I am considering using the Armstrong Clark semi solid stain on a very old deck because of better color. Does this stain have a tendency to peel off after a few years? I don’t plan to follow the prep steps religiously. Any tips on avoiding a peeling disaster?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 07/05/2020
      No, it does not peel as it is a penetrating stain. Just one coat.
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    Dave R · 06/30/2020
    Hi - In many of the Q&A responses you mention "do not back brush". Can you please explain what that is?
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      Armstrong · 06/30/2020
      Do not back "wipe" off excess stain right away. You can after 4-8 hours if needed.
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        Dave R · 06/30/2020
        Ok but its ok while applying to go back over some wet spots or streaking with the brush?
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          Armstrong · 06/30/2020
          To ensure an even application, yes.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Paul Lebow · 06/25/2020
    BTW - 10 yr old deck has been power washed only 3 weeks ago - did a very good job - wood smooth and not damaged at all. Will use semi-trans
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Paul Lebow · 06/25/2020
    Its 5pm here - pouring rain thundershower on my pine pressure-treated deck (2000sf). Can I stain tomorrow or must I wait a full 24 hours?
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    Heather G. · 06/24/2020
    What is the clean up process for rollers and brushes? Paint thinner? Thanks.
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    Joe P · 06/22/2020
    Was wondering if you would recommend doing one or two coats of semi transparent stain. Put one coat down already. Wood soaked it up really well. Some areas look lighter than others despite being evenly applied.
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/23/2020
      Post a picture.
      • We will reply to your comment shortly
        Joe P · 06/23/2020
        Some areas appear lighter than others..
        • We will reply to your comment shortly
          Armstrong · 06/23/2020
          New wood or older wood?
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            Joe P · 06/23/2020
            Old wood. Had not been treated many years before I bought the house.
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              Armstrong · 06/23/2020
              Do one very light coat then.
              • We will reply to your comment shortly
                Heather G. · 06/24/2020
                Is that one more very light coat on old wood? I have the same question as I have a mix of old and new. Also, one of my oldest boards ended up bleeding out pine sap which I can't believe as it is so old. Did I put on too much stain?
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                  Armstrong · 06/24/2020
                  Yes, one more light coat. Sap can happen even if on old wood.
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                Joe P · 06/23/2020
                Thank you for the info.
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                  Greg · 06/26/2020
                  So for the light second coat you recommended for Heather G and Joe P - is that after the first coat is completely dry, or while it’s still wet? How long after first coat?
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                    Armstrong · 06/26/2020
                    Wet on wet. 20-60 minutes after first coat.
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                      Greg · 06/26/2020
                      I assume 20-60 minutes is not long enough after staining an area to walk on it, so if you’re doing wet on wet - you have to do an area small enough to reach without walking on it after the first coat. Is that correct?
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                        Armstrong · 06/27/2020
                        You can walk on the first coat, just do not step in the second coat.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Heather G. · 06/22/2020
    So...a Saharan dust storm is making its way to NC this weekend. Health advisories are being posted. I can wear a mask. BUT...will dust settle on my deck?? To stain or not to stain, that is the question!
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    William · 06/22/2020
    Your instructions say to apply the stain on a day that no rain is expected and for 3-4 hours after application. I find that information to be a bit confusing, so I ask how much dry time do I need after applying the semi-transparent stain before rain will not affect the application?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/23/2020
      3-4 hours after applying is correct.
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    Heather G. · 06/22/2020
    What does IPE mean? "IPE needs to be redone annually"
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/22/2020
      IPE is a wood type. A hardwood from Brazil.
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    Greg · 06/21/2020
    I’m planning on using your semi-trans stain, and I see that it can be applied on hot days in direct sunlight. Does humidity matter? I live in the mid-Atlantic region (Maryland) where it can get humid in the summer months.

    I assume it’s better to stain later in the day, after any morning dew has “burned off”?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/22/2020
      Humidity does not matter. Wood cannot be damp from dew.
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    Greg · 06/20/2020
    Hi, I have a PT pine deck that’s 20+ years old. One year ago I sanded the entire deck because many boards were splintered, and I replaced several boards too. After waiting a full year for the new boards to season, I’m ready to stain but because of my job I have to hire someone to prep so I can stain by a certain date. A couple of companies I’ve contacted use a cleaning solution that contains sodium hypochlorite. Questions:

    (1) I realize sodium hypochlorite may not be the best thing to use on wood on a repeated basis, but I assume it will be ok to use just this one time (since that’s what I’m finding local companies use), as long as it’s followed with RAD brightener. Would you agree?

    (2) Even though most of the boards are old, I sanded them down so I assume just one coat for now (after prep), followed by a maintenance coat in 12-18 months or so. I’m using Armstrong-Clark semi-trans.

    Thanks.
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/20/2020
      1. It should be fine.
      2. Just one coat.
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    Laurie · 06/16/2020
    Hello. I believe I have a mahogany deck and I used the rad stripper and brightener and then tested the hardwood amber stain sample I received. I love it. I only had enough sample to do 2 stairs and since this was a sample I had to wait awhile to get my 5 gallon bucket. Now the remainder of the deck is stripped, brightened and sanded, (RAD didn’t quite bust through the old stains). I want to stain tomorrow as I’ve waited 48 hours since prep. Looking back to my original 2 steps the color has drastically faded. Is this because my deck is super dry and is thirsty? How many coats would you recommend?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/17/2020
      Yes, the wood is dried out but this color is normal as it cures. Just one coat this year and another next year. Clean first before recoating.
      • We will reply to your comment shortly
        Laurie · 06/17/2020
        Great, thanks for the reply. The deck hasn’t been stained in maybe 3 years as I was trying to bleed out an old semi transparent stain. This is it stripped, brightened and sanded. I’ll give it 1 coat today.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Julie · 06/16/2020
    Thank you
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    Julie · 06/16/2020
    Also, how long can you keep a can of stain? I like getting the 5 gallon bucket however, I won't need that much, just wanted to see how long it will last in a cool dry basement.
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/16/2020
      Opened, about 12 months. A few years if unopened.
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    Julie · 06/16/2020
    I have the 5 gallon bucket of stain, how often does it need to be stirred? I have noticed a couple of clumps when pouring it out.
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    Ted Larsen · 06/15/2020
    Hi, A few days ago I coated my mahogany back stairs with Hardwood/IPE Amber stain. Prior to staining, I did the 2-step stripping (to remove old stain) and brightening process and let it dry a couple days. I waited 24 hours before wiping away a few glossy areas and initially the results looked great. A few hours later it rained pretty hard and now the stairs have a mottled look that hasn't gone away. As I said, I wiped the excess product off the stairs but after the storm I noticed beads of water with oil floating on top. The mottling appeared after everything dried up. What are my options for evening out the stain? Can I just reapply a light coat on the stairs?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/15/2020
      Try a light coat to just one step and see how it looks after it dries before recoating all of them.
      • We will reply to your comment shortly
        Ted Larsen · 06/16/2020
        Thanks. I tried a thin coat on one of the stair treads and it darkened the board but you can still see the mottling. Why would this happen after a 24 hour cure? The instructions say it can handle rain after 3 - 4 hours after application.

        In any case, what are my options? Should I try sanding to even things out then re-staining?
        • We will reply to your comment shortly
          Armstrong · 06/16/2020
          Not sure, maybe wood was wet there and had trouble curing? Best to try and sand and reapply.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Shelly · 06/14/2020
    My redwood deck is one year old and we used clear Armstrong last year on the new deck. It hasn’t had that much wear/use. Do you still recommend the RAD cleaning prior to the Armstrong coat? Thank you!
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/15/2020
      Yes, you always have to prep before staining.
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    Mike Poniatowski · 06/14/2020
    I have a Wagner Spraytech 0518080 Control Spray Max HVLP Paint or Stain Sprayer. It is not airless. I am preparing to seal my deck with Armstrong Clark Semi transparent sealer. Can I use my sprayer or would I be better off not using it? Thank you.
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/14/2020
      If it sprays fine then no issues. Never tested this sprayer to know for sure if it will work.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Tony · 06/14/2020
    Applying your stain for hardwoods to 15 year old ipe deck.. last stained 5 years ago. Stripped and cleaned. 1 coat or 2?
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Ted Larsen · 06/10/2020
    Hi, I followed the instructions and coated my mahogany porch with Hardwood/IPE stain yesterday. The results look good and the oils have almost all been completely absorbed so there will be minimal cleanup. This was new (weathered for 6 months) mahogany. Prior to coating I did the 2-step prep cleaner and brightener. In hindsight, I should have sanded prior to staining as the surface is rough in places with many small splinters and is not barefoot friendly. What are my options at this point? I don't want to go through the entire process again. Can I wait a few days and lightly sand to remove splinters? If not, what are my options. Thanks!
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/10/2020
      Yes try that but very light as you do not want to remove the stain.
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    ken · 06/08/2020
    can i stain deck if temperature in is the 50's?
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    Donna · 06/08/2020
    Hi, I purchased the RAD cleaner brightener and your semi transparent stain. Just a couple of questions before I begin: 1) Do I need to clean and brighten the spindles and railing/posts? 2) Do I begin with the railings and spindles before proceeding to the actual deck. This is my first deck staining attempt.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Ted Larsen · 06/08/2020
    Hi, I have my mahogany deck all prepped and will be staining with Hardwood/IPE stain when dry. I used to use Cabot and would generally roll it on and brush it in a section at a time. When done with each section I would wipe excess stain off with a rag to get an even finish. Your instructions above say to wait 24 hours before wiping excess. My concern is this may create darker spots or be difficult to mop up in sunny spots if it's cured. I just want to confirm this is best practice before I get started. Thanks!
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/08/2020
      Yes, that is correct. Do not back wipe right away as you may remove the curing oils before it has a chance to dry.
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    Joe V · 06/08/2020
    I finished my deck yesterday and I have 2 issues this morning .
    1 I noticed that in some areas I over applyed the stain and
    2 sime boards do ot to seem to have enough stain.

    What can I do at this point to to blend it in ?
    Thanks

    Joe
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/08/2020
      Let it cure for a few days or week, it should help to even out.
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        Joe · 06/08/2020
        Please see the attached photos
        • We will reply to your comment shortly
          Armstrong · 06/08/2020
          Unfortunately, you cannot spot remove some and then spot apply some and have it all blend. Applying an entire coat at this point would even it out but you will have over application areas that may have issues curing correctly. The really only way to fix is to remove all and start over and I am not sure if you want to do this?
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Bruce · 06/02/2020
    Hi there

    I’m about to start a deck staining project on a deck that is about 4 years old that has never had any stain applied. The floor section is mahogany and the walls/benches are cedar. We live in Toronto, Ontario so winters are long and can get very cold. Was thinking of using the Hardwood product for both mahogany and cedar. Pictures below show the wood both dry and wet (which highlights the difference). Have already power washed and intend to sand the cedar as power washing appears to have been too hard on cedar. Some questions which I was hoping to get your informed views on: 1) is it ok to use the Hardwood product on both wood surfaces? 2) will the end result be as distinct as the attached photos when the bare wood is wet or will it appear as same colour? 3) given no stain has been applied before, do I need to apply the clean and brighten steps? 4) to calculate the amount of stain I need should I measure all surfaces as being the same as deck in your calculator as there are no railings. Thanks in advance
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/02/2020
      1. Yes.
      2. You cannot get cedar to match Mahogany so yes, they will be different colors no matter what.
      3. Yes.
      4. Yes, but round up since your sides are all solid wood.
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        Bruce · 06/02/2020
        Thanks for the quick response. I have added it all up and including all the external facing wall sections it is around 1000 square feet. So 7 gallons should be about right for the single coat I figure.
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    Steve · 06/01/2020
    Clear redwood deck 16 yrs old, sanded, stained w/ Armstrong Redwood Tone when new redone every 4 years. Just finished sanding/staining. Applied second coat of Armstrong by roller and back brush. Wiped up any puddles
    but still getting some wet spots appearing when sun shines on deck even a week later. Will this eventually
    go away. Deck looks fabulous, couldn't be happier w/ Armstrong!!
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 06/01/2020
      Yes, it will go away but you can wipe down the deck with mineral spirits to speed it along. Saturate all oil rags in water when done and lay flat to dry outside.
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    Thor · 05/30/2020
    A thunderstorm arrived about 1 1/2 hours after application. The deck is old. It was prepared properly and dry before application. The past 2 days have dry and sunny. Question: did The rain compromise the process? If so, how can I evaluate ad and what can I do?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 05/30/2020
      If it looks good then it is fine. You would be able to visually see if there was a problem.
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        Thor · 05/30/2020
        A lot of color washed away in storm. How much time should we wait to reapply? Is there any other step we need to take before re-applying? It’s an old cedar deck and we are using black walnut
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          Armstrong · 05/30/2020
          Post a picture.
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            Thor · 05/30/2020
            Photos
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              Armstrong · 05/30/2020
              You can reapply now. Just one light coat. Make sure the wood is dry and clean.
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    Justin · 05/29/2020
    We have a Mahogany covered porch/deck. It was originally varnished 4ish years ago and was peeling. I have prepped with a belt sander (first with 80 grit, then finished with 120 grit). I bought AC hardwood semi-transparent samples to choose color (Amber vs Mahogany). We have settled on Mahogany but the curing experience has me concerned. After my research, I applied what I believe was a light coat (amber and mahogany side by side to compare color) with one of those 1" foam $.69 brushes from big box. I did not wipe at time of application. 24 hours later it was noticeably wet and stain transferred to my finger on a light touch to check. Since it was 24 hours later, and based on advice I've seen in these 17 pages of Q&A, I wiped it. I came back another 12 hours later (overnight) and it appeared dry with no transfer when touching it (it looked great). Because I was testing and wanted to find out what I'm in for, I took towel and gave a more aggressive wipe. With a more aggressive wipe, I noticed some stain transfer to the towel.

    I searched each of the pages of comments for 'wipe' and read the various scenarios. There is a lot of consistency in the advice given, but it's not perfect. All say 'do not wipe right away', a lot say 'wipe after 24 hours', some say 'do not wipe at all (ever)'.

    The weather was 80ish, no rain, but humid. I don't want to wipe away ingredients that help prolong the value I'm putting into my deck.

    Possible thoughts:
    1) It was humid, I should have waited more than 24 hours to wipe.
    2) The more aggressive wiping I did 36 hours after application is considered to be "working as designed, it doesn't get any better than this"
    3) I read a comment about 120gr sanding won't allow for proper absorption. This is only one comment and doesn't seem to be substantiated by other comments.
    4) It appears as if the chemical applications (stripper, cleaner, brightener) are not necessary if it was a few year old peeled varnished that was sanded down to fresh wood. A lot of the deck/porch wasn't peeling and no signs of rot or degradation. Brightener is, among a few other things, to PH balance after stripper and stripper/cleaner doesn't seem necessary when I did the prepping I did.
    5) I'm really not in support of a bunch of fixing procedures after I'm done (spraying/washing with mineral spirits, new/additional coats, reapplication, etc.).

    Questions:
    A) What can I do to get more comfort to place the full order and finish the project?
    B) Is it ok to wipe after 24 hours and just live with whatever transfer may happen after? Will transfer diminish as it has more time to cure in this scenario?
    C) Am I shortening the life of the project by wiping after 24 hours?
    D) does even the slightest indication transfer indicate that, since there's some form of oil still present, it will collect and show dust, pollen, dirt and fade darker more quickly?
    • We will reply to your comment shortly
      Armstrong · 05/29/2020
      Your issue is because of the sanding. It cannot fully absorb in.
      a. let the wood sit for unstained afore 3-4 weeks and then clean and brighten for prep. This will open up the wood grain.
      b. Yes.
      c. No.
      d. No.
      • We will reply to your comment shortly
        Justin · 05/29/2020
        Much appreciated. If I re-sand with 80 grit do I need to wait 3-4 weeks and apply the chemicals? I have never seen a 'wait 3-4 weeks' when it's being sanded back to wood.
        • We will reply to your comment shortly
          Armstrong · 05/29/2020
          Yes, that would help to "swell" or open up the wood pores. Sanding with 120 grit is over sanding and closes the wood pores.